How On-Demand Video Delivery By IPTV Services Work

Video delivered over IP networks in all of its flavors is a massive opportunity, as well as an incredible challenge facing telecom service providers, which means the technology, provider’s demographics and content must be aligned.

If you believed everything you read about the imminent arrival of IP video, whether that means video on demand, IPTV, or any other variety, you’d think it was a no-brainer. It’s a lot like the promises in the early days of cable TV that went kind of like this: “Hundreds, no, thousands of channels will be yours at the push of a button.” While that may be true now, it wasn’t then, and so it goes for IP video.

The pressure is on telecom service providers to deploy video in many forms sooner, faster and better than their competitors. Have a look at SearchTelecom.com’s newest guide for a look at what’s driving IP video, how to turn the dream into revenue, and how to best ready your infrastructure.

Video delivery, content network, IPTV, triple play — these are just a few of the terms used today for video over broadband data networks. To learn more about this service we suggest you hop over to this website. This concept of video networks is an increasing challenge, and like most network challenges, this one is influenced by technology, business and regulatory factors.

Video poses three major challenges to network planners and operators. First, video is bandwidth hungry as an application. A video file is huge in comparison with almost any other type of information carried over a network. Second, streaming video requires real-time consistent network performance. Most broadband applications are highly tolerant of variations in delay and packet loss, but video is often totally corrupted by even a small variation in delay, and any significant packet loss can destroy the viewing experience. Finally, video is perceived by the user to be a continuous long-term experience, and if any significant portion goes badly, complaints and demands for refunds will result. Unlike a lost call or a bad connection in voice, which users repair simply by redialing, a video connection is a commitment on both parties, and any failure is almost certain to create negative customer reaction.

These factors influence all video networks, but the degree of impact depends on the video model. There are three broadband video service models. Broadcast video models replicate the behavior of a cable system, offering a customer multi-channel viewing. Video on demand (VoD) models allow the customer to stream video in real time, but the video and the viewing time are selected by the customer. The “store for play” model (download model) allows the customer to load the video onto a local disk for viewing.

All video networks start with the same customer, so the first step in understanding video network design is to understand where the networks stop — what the content source will be. General practice today is to cache content in each major metro area, and this is most likely to be done for the broadcast or streaming VoD models. Local caching eliminates the performance variability that is introduced by Internet transport or core peering relationships, and most video programming popular enough to be profitable will probably be consumed enough in a metro area to justify the cost of local storage. This means that most video networks will be metro networks.

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *